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Quality theatrical experience at a modest price

Lorraine Graves   Feb-07-2018

Submitted photo


If you are looking for a fine afternoon of theatre this Sunday, Feb. 11 from 2 to 5 p.m., look no further than our own Gateway Theatre.

Easy to get to, easy to park, and affordable at $15 per ticket (available at Gateway), UNSCRIPTED: Salesman in China offers theatre-goers a chance to taste something familiar yet different at the same time.

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Brought to Richmond by Playwrights Theatre Centre (PTC), Gateway Theatre’s artistic director Jovanni Sy and playwright/translator Leanna Brodie showcase their new play, UNSCRIPTED: Salesman in China, inspired by a ground-breaking 1983 international collaboration which has so much to say to the Vancouver of today.

According to PTC, in 1983, the early days of detente, “When Arthur Miller went to Beijing to direct his masterpiece, Death of a Salesman at Beijing People’s Art Theatre, the world’s media buzzed with excitement and doubt.

“Could the Chinese possibly connect with this quintessentially American tragedy? Could an American truly understand China?”

According to PTC, “For two months in 1983, two of the world’s great artists struggled to bridge the abyss between two of the world’s great cultures. UNSCRIPTED: Salesman in China unearths their incredible story.”

The weekend’s production at Gateway shows the cultural yin and yang between China and America while also highlighting the commonalities in Death of a Salesman.

According to PTC, theatre goers can expect to: “Experience an excerpt from Death of a Salesman performed in both Mandarin and English. Explore the amazing story of Miller and Ying’s production with Dr. Claire Conceison, MIT professor of Chinese Culture and Professor of Theater Arts. Dig into the fascinating world of Chinese-English cross-cultural work with veteran translator Fang Zhang. Enjoy some immersive experiences that will bring you into the world of the play – Beijing in 1983 – including the Memory Booth, historical displays and a selection of Beijing-style snacks.”

Quality theatre, bridging a cultural gap, and snacks. Sounds like a fine afternoon to me.


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